Medical Alert Bracelets & Proactive Injury Prevention for Seniors Living

Jenny

Eating right, staying fit and wearing a medical alert bracelet, are good choices for health and safety. It’s Your Health is a Canadian article which indicates that “Nearly half of all injuries among seniors happen at home.” Making a conscious choice and effort in choosing healthy foods to eat and exercising to maintain flexibility, balance and muscle strength are ways to ensure fewer falls and injuries occur at home. These health and safety measures for seniors living at home are important aspects of proactive injury prevention.

Healthy Eating for Seniors states that, “Canadian seniors age 65 and over are living longer than ever before. However, recent surveys suggest investigating the eating and exercise habits of Canadians age -65-84- reveal that seniors could be doing better.”

Healthy Eating is vital in maintaining good health, strong bones and muscles. This is particularly an issue for seniors, especially if they are living on their own. Preparing a meal for one may seem like a great deal of work however putting the effort out is important. Inviting a friend or family member to share a meal may be just the incentive needed for an elderly person to eat well. Eating calcium rich foods, such as milk products, almonds or broccoli and taking vitamins will ensure that a seniors’ bones are strong. Drinking water is also vital for good health.

Take Five, an article from the Canadian Safety Council highlights five proactive measures to prevent falls and injuries.

This downloadable book, Healthy Eating for Seniors from the government of British Columbia, features many excellent suggestions for healthy eating along with a one-week meal plan. Preparing and sharing a meal with someone may be just the incentive needed to encourage a senior to make healthy food choices by eating proper meals.

Safety Labs Inc. offers safety devices in the form of medical alert bracelets, pendants and keychains. A senior can press the button on the Safety button if there is an emergency. Family, friends and 911 are immediately contacted and made aware that an emergency has occurred. This  explainer video details more about the Safety Anchor.

Exercising and staying active along with healthy eating can help control weight, improve muscle strength, flexibility, produce stronger bones and provide better balance in seniors. All of which can contribute to preventing less injuries if a senior were to fall. Walking, jogging, running, cycling, joining a gym, dance, aerobics, martial arts, yoga, swimming, golfing, tennis, etc., are just a few examples of the many choices available.

Some fitness facilities may offer a senior discount. If cost presents an issue, seniors can walk or jog within their community, or participate in a fitness program on T.V.  Snow and other inclement forms of weather may cause a senior to walk inside like in a mall. Staying active with a friend adds to accountability. It’s always easier to complete a task with someone. These three articles outline the benefits of exercise and provide some tips to consider for those over the age of 65. Exercise Guidelines for Seniors,    Exercise Benefits for the Elderly, and Fitness for Older Adults. 

The benefits of making good food choices and staying active far outweigh the idle life of the elderly and poor eating habits. For a senior who was active before the age of 65 and eating well, their healthy lifestyle will be maintained. If a senior has been less active there will be changes to their daily life however, these changes are for their betterment. Medical alert bracelets, healthy eating and fitness are important in keeping seniors safe.

References used as links in this article:

https://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hl-vs/iyh-vsv/life-vie/fp-pc-eng.php

https://canadasafetycouncil.org/campaigns/take-five-prevent-falls

https://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/people/seniors/health-safety/pdf/hefs_web_english.pdf

https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/healthy_living/hic_Challenges_and_Choices_of_Aging/hic_Exercise_Guidelines_for_Seniors

https://www.agingcare.com/Articles/Exercise-benefits-for-the-Elderly-95383.htm

https://www.healthline.com/health/fitness-exercise-for-seniors#Overview1

All images are from Pixabay

 

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